Portfolio Project Option #1: Submit Portfolio Outline Submit an outline of your Portfolio Project. Please review the rubric. Directions: The first step to understanding an argument is to dissect the c

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Portfolio Project Option #1: Submit Portfolio Outline

Submit an outline of your Portfolio Project. Please review the rubric.

Directions:

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  1. The first step to understanding an argument is to dissect the claims (premises) and the conclusions. As you are creating this 1-2 page outline of your portfolio, it is a good time to begin to analyze your own claims.
  2. Provide four scholarly articles that you might consider using for your final Portfolio Project. Give a short reason why each would be pertinent to your project. This is not expected to be a final list. The goal here is to motivate you to begin examining research that might help you in your final Portfolio Project. Add a reference section for your research sources.
  3. Format your outline according to the CSU-Global Guide to Writing and APA (Links to an external site.). Remember, next week (Week 7), students will practice their critical thinking skills by offering feedback on your outline.

Portfolio Project Option #1: Submit Portfolio Outline Submit an outline of your Portfolio Project. Please review the rubric. Directions: The first step to understanding an argument is to dissect the c
Running head: MILESTONE 0 Portfolio Milestone For the Portfolio Project I will be selecting Option #1: Paper: Evaluation and Analysis of Change Management Plan. The organization I am selecting for the project is Hewlett-Packard or HP: A Deer Caught in the Headlights. I first chose this organization due to being familiar with their products and organization as a whole. Reading the information of organizational change and the changes Carleton Fiorina planned to make becoming the new CEO, there are several talking points. Working with companies that have reached out of the company for hiring, there are pros and cons I have experienced. One major point that suck out for this topic and paper is the new CEO wanting to base her changes off a previous company she worked for assuming this will be a flawless transition. There a several negatives that arise before Carly even took over that can be seen as red flags. These negatives are first Carly not knowing the company fully as she is an “outsider”, employee resistance to the change, along with not have embracing the idea that just because a process worked for one company does not mean it will work for all companies. With an organizational change, these are impactful components. The audience will be the board of directors for this paper. With this given information and the template, this organization has potential to be successful in an organizational change. Having been in situations where this type of transaction or hiring has occurred, I feel I could provide a strong analysis of how it could be successful in my eyes. The goal for the end analysis will be to demonstrate how this change can be successful at Hewlett-Packard. References Anderson, D. L. (2019). Organization development: The process of leading organizational change. SAGE Publications, Incorporated. Dawson, P. (2019). Reshaping change: A processual perspective. Routledge. Jabri, M. (2017). Managing organizational change: Process, social construction and dialogue. Palgrave. Lewis, L. (2019). Organizational change. John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated. Stouten, J., Rousseau, D. M., & De Cremer, D. (2018). Successful organizational change: Integrating the management practice and scholarly literatures. Academy of Management Annals, 12(2), 752-788. Zell, D. (2018). Changing by design: Organizational innovation at Hewlett-Packard. Cornell University Press.
Portfolio Project Option #1: Submit Portfolio Outline Submit an outline of your Portfolio Project. Please review the rubric. Directions: The first step to understanding an argument is to dissect the c
Instructions for Organizational Change Management Planning Template This document provides guiding principles for using the Organization Change Management (OCM) Plan template for all Category 1, 2 3 projects. It should be used by the change leadership team to effectively communicate the project goals, activities and progress to target audiences. These principles have 10 planning steps. This is document is a guideline and not all planning steps in this document will apply to all OCM plans. Note: Change Champion and Change Team has been identified. Change team may change as the project progresses. Plan to expand the change team as the project moves toward implementation. Introduction: Briefly state the mission of the OCM Plan for communicating the change strategy, include overall goal of the implementation and/or changes to the organizational structure Adding new organizational units Staffing Reporting/supervision Changing roles & responsibilities for organizational units that will continue into the future state Dissolving organizational units Ceasing action on discontinued roles and responsibilities Reallocating roles and responsibilities to continuing entities (if appropriate) Staffing reductions Realigning organizational structures and reporting relationships Organizational Change Management – Overview. Briefly describe the current state, future state, potential impacts: a. Describe the Current State Identify the business processes/operational processes impacted by the project Detail those processes (Include the processes that are directly impacted (primary processes), as well as those that provide input to the primary processes (supplies processes) or receive input from those primary processes (customer processes)) Identify controlling Code of Virginia sections, policies, standards, regulations, procedures Documentation Flow Charts Data Flow Diagrams Code of Virginia sections Policies Standards Regulations Procedures Identify the stakeholders of those processes Describe the stakeholder’s interests/roles Staffing Identify the knowledge, skills and abilities required to perform the current business processes Documentation Organizational Charters & Mission Statements Position Descriptions RACI Diagrams Identify and describe the organizational structures that have been established to perform, manage and oversee the primary processes Documentation Organizational Charts b. Describe the Future State (Vision) Identify the business processes/operational processes that will be performed using the new system. (To the greatest extent possible, avoid comparisons with the Current State. Detail those processes Include end-state primary, customer and supplier processes Documentation Flow Charts Data Flow Diagrams Code of Virginia sections Policies Standards Regulations Procedures Identify the stakeholders of those end-state processes Describe the stakeholder’s interests/roles Identify the knowledge, skills and abilities required to perform the current business processes Documentation Position Descriptions RACI Diagrams Identify the organizational structures that will be required to perform, manage and oversee the end-state processes c. Assess the Potential Impacts Changes to business processes such as process re-engineering Critical milestones that must be me for success Changes to the code of Virginia, polices, standards, regulations Stakeholder interests and changes of stakeholders Staffing – adding permanent staff, contractors, job description changes, organizational assignments, new skill-sets Organizational structures, i.e. changes in supervision Estimated costs and funding Fill-in the names for Stakeholder Management (Reference Communications Plan) Stakeholder Names (Project Sponsor, business process owner, Agency Head, etc) Awareness (HML) – (Assess how much the stakeholder is aware of the change) Level of Support – (Financial, resources, technology) Influence (HML) – (Assess the measure of influence on money and/or resources, etc.) Contingency Plan (as needed) – What if scenarios…such as required resources are not available OCM Overview (continued) – Communications: The Change Team is responsible for developing the flow of communication. Below are some things to consider when developing your communications strategy: Communication (develop a format that aligns with balance of frequency and method to provide meaningful information). Communicate only when you have something meaningful to communicate. Simple: Reduce amount of information being distributed so that important messages are actually read – clear and simple. Why this is important – What’s in it for me? (WIIFM) HR impact Training impact Policy and procedure Changes – Workflow changes Consistency: Remain consistent in language style, communication channel and timing. Create a standard template for all messages. (IF exists within Comms Plan consider distribution style) Audience (SOC, IAOC, CIOs, AITRs. Project Executive Sponsors, Project Team, Change Control Board, etc) Key Message(s) Delivery Method(s) Frequency Sender (Change Team is responsible) Continuous Improvement: Change Leadership team should evaluate and assess the effectiveness by asking for feedback. Share this feedback with key stakeholders. Stakeholder Analysis: Maintain positive attitude Demonstrate commitment to the change Provide reinforcement required for success of the change Communication Activities Project Newsletter Project Website Change Agent Network Training Campaign (Pilot training, UAT, Train-the-Trainer) Knowledge transfer User Community Groups (End-User and Process Owner groups) Training Objectives: Use as necessary. Link to project training plan documentation. Below are suggestions on the required or expected training resulting from the change: Document in easy to read method Allow input into method of training (hands-on training, CBT, Train-the-trainer, etc) Have you solicited end-users to conduct UAT Develop training for new system, new employee, employee sustainment training Upcoming Changing. Provide the organization with information necessary to prepare for upcoming changes. Fill-in the information about the new policy and/or procedures relative to the change. 5. Provide the Organization with Information Necessary to Prepare for Upcoming Changes Policy / Procedure Type of Change Required Suggested Plan Develop Training. Fill-in stakeholder group, necessary training required because of the change and ways to deliver training, such as training classes or CBTs. 6. Develop Training Stakeholder Group Type of Training Required Optimum Setting Delivery Method Suggested Job Aids Training Documentation Requirements. Insert all required necessary training documents, who is responsible for the training and who reviewed the training. 7. Training Documentation Requirements Training Documents Author(s) Reviewer(s) Training Facility Requirements and Budget. As applicable. If formal training is required, please not location, groups to be trained, type of training and the date. Is there a cost for training, normally training is free. 8. Training Facility Requirements & Budget (as applicable) Training Facility Stakeholder Group(s) Type of Training Date Post Implementation Steps – User Groups. As applicable. This is to ensure that all individuals were aware of the change. Insert department, support person for that department and timeline for support. 9. Post Implementation Steps – Users Group (as applicable) Department/Division Support Staff Name Support Period Organizational Change Management Team. List those individuals assigned to the change management team, along with their role and contact information. These individuals could be assigned at the PM on the project team or a project team lead. 10. Organizational Change Management Team Name Department/Role Contact Information Team Member Name Department Contact Information Organizational Change Management Team / Signature. Insert Project Manager who has the overall responsibility for the project. List the key individuals who will review the OCM plan and agree with the contents and objectives. Owner Target Organization Type of Communication Date(s) Link_To_Change_Request_Form Appendix A: List source file documents (optional) VITA Project Management Division (Contact: Linda Bell-Sinclair, dated 08/12)
Portfolio Project Option #1: Submit Portfolio Outline Submit an outline of your Portfolio Project. Please review the rubric. Directions: The first step to understanding an argument is to dissect the c
Running head: MILESTONE 0 ““A Deer Caught in the Headlights” at HP Plagued by poor performance in its computer and printer business, Hewlett‐Packard’s board hired Carleton (Carly) Fiorina from Lucent.1 This represented the first time since its 1939 founding that HP had reached outside the company for a CEO. Appreciating the urgency of the situation, Fiorina hit the ground running. Her first public appearances were well staged and electric. What she had in mind was clear. She would reorganize HP in order to centralize decision making, revitalize the sales force, trim costs, and energize employees. Based on her previous experience at Lucent, Fiorina had a clear idea of how she would achieve her goals, which she revealed at her first strategic meeting just a month after her arrival. To reverse the company’s “sacred” emphasis on decentralization, she proposed a simpler, more centralized structure: two “back‐end” divisions (each back‐end division included design, manufacturing, and distribution—one for printers, the other for computers) and two “front‐end” marketing and sales operations—one for consumers and the other for corporate customers. The company would also begin to focus on far fewer products. “This is a company that can do anything,” she told executives, “it is not a company that can do everything.” Finally, the culture would change dramatically and immediately to emphasize performance. “Let me make something very clear,” Fiorina told executives. “You will make your numbers. There will be no excuses. And if you can’t make your numbers, I will find someone who will.” Fiorina asked for the support of HP’s top executives on her centralization and reorganization plan, and she got it. That is not to say, however, that they all agreed with her. “I don’t know anyone who was in favor of it [her back‐end/front‐end reorganization plan] other than Carly,” said one. “She came in with a recipe,” said another, “and come hell or high water, she was going to use it.” Carolyn Ticknor, head of laser printing, recalled, “I was a deer caught in the headlights when she [Fiorina] described the front and back end.” Six years after the announcement of the reorganization plan, the company’s board demanded Fiorina’s resignation. The board again looked outside of HP for a replacement; this time selecting Mark Hurd of NCR. When reporters asked Hurd about his plans to revitalize the company, he responded that it was too soon to tell. “We’ll look at the entire enterprise,” he said. “I can’t give you any guarantees on anything,” he added. 2 Diagnosing the Organization The desire on the part of executives such as Carly Fiorina to “hit the ground running” with solutions, particularly when their organizations are mired in poor performance, may be perfectly understandable. The tendency to believe that what has worked for them in the past can provide a kind of recipe for the future is also strong. Reorganization worked at Lucent; why not do the same at HP? Taking that approach, however, fails to create mutual engagement and shared diagnosis that is so critical in shaping and guiding change. It can lead to solutions that are inappropriate to the target organization and are not supported—perhaps even actively resisted—by employees. Theory into Practice Effective change starts with action, not solutions. The desire for quick solutions can lead executives to overlook the critical elements of learning and commitment that can be built through mutual engagement and shared diagnosis. The dynamics of every organization are unique. Additionally, an organization’s external competitive forces are likely to be in a state of flux. Therefore, applying a recipe—what worked somewhere else in the past will work here now—can be overly simple, misleading, and even dysfunctional. Lucent’s best practices may not have been applicable to HP. The act of imposing those practices is likely to evoke resistance. Lack of mutual engagement—of holding an honest conversation among employees about what needed to change, why, and how—leads to low levels of employee commitment. Diagnosis is meant to create learning about the real, current, and unique dynamics impacting the organization’s performance. When combined with mutual engagement, it is designed to create deep and wide commitment to the desired outcome. Theory into Practice Don’t expect formulas—solutions that have worked in the past and are imposed on the current situation—to work for your organization. At its most fundamental level, diagnosis is about learning: learning what needs to be changed and why. Learning is the process by which individuals receive data from the external environment, analyze that data, and adjust their thinking and behaviors accordingly. The notion of shared diagnosis goes one step further. For effective change implementation to occur, many employees at multiple hierarchical levels and in varied units need to change in the same direction. A diagnostic process engaged in by an individual, no matter how insightful, highly placed, or influential that individual may be, will not lead to coordinated change. It is only when the same diagnosis is shared by multiple individuals that change implementation can move forward effectively.”
Portfolio Project Option #1: Submit Portfolio Outline Submit an outline of your Portfolio Project. Please review the rubric. Directions: The first step to understanding an argument is to dissect the c
Running head: MILESTONE 0 Portfolio Milestone Name Course Number (ORG521) – Managing Dynamic Environments Colorado State University – Global Campus Dr. Harvey Wiess April 12, 2020 Portfolio Milestone For the Portfolio Project I will be selecting Option #1: Paper: Evaluation and Analysis of Change Management Plan. The organization I am selecting for the project is Hewlett-Packard or HP: A Deer Caught in the Headlights. I first chose this organization due to being familiar with their products and organization as a whole. Reading the information of organizational change and the changes Carleton Fiorina planned to make becoming the new CEO, there are several talking points. Working with companies that have reached out of the company for hiring, there are pros and cons I have experienced. One major point that suck out for this topic and paper is the new CEO wanting to base her changes off a previous company she worked for assuming this will be a flawless transition. There a several negatives that arise before Carly even took over that can be seen as red flags. These negatives are first Carly not knowing the company fully as she is an “outsider”, employee resistance to the change, along with not have embracing the idea that just because a process worked for one company does not mean it will work for all companies. With an organizational change, these are impactful components. The audience will be the board of directors for this paper. With this given information and the template, this organization has potential to be successful in an organizational change. Having been in situations where this type of transaction or hiring has occurred, I feel I could provide a strong analysis of how it could be successful in my eyes. The goal for the end analysis will be to demonstrate how this change can be successful at Hewlett-Packard. References Anderson, D. L. (2019). Organization development: The process of leading organizational change. SAGE Publications, Incorporated. Dawson, P. (2019). Reshaping change: A processual perspective. Routledge. Jabri, M. (2017). Managing organizational change: Process, social construction and dialogue. Palgrave. Lewis, L. (2019). Organizational change. John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated. Stouten, J., Rousseau, D. M., & De Cremer, D. (2018). Successful organizational change: Integrating the management practice and scholarly literatures. Academy of Management Annals, 12(2), 752-788. Zell, D. (2018). Changing by design: Organizational innovation at Hewlett-Packard. Cornell University Press.

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